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20110703
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
thing is like one big test. >> it's fascinating watching you because i know you don't like watching yourself, do you? >> i've gotten a lot better. since i've been producing, i've gotten a lot better with it. when i started, i had a really -- i hate my voice. i hate the way i sound. and i think that was always hard. >> that's not your real voice, is it, that's the problem. >> yeah, maybe, because it sounds foreign. but since i've become a producer and i've had to kind of, you know, sit in editing rooms and sit for hours and watch footage be cut together, i think -- i think i've gotten better to kind of take myself out of it and really look at it as making a film. and you kind of take all that weight off just yourself, which has been really great for me as an actor. >> you bring incredible intensity to this stuff. scare the life out of me. i'm just watching it from a monitor. you're like a raging volcano in some of these parts. >> a raging volcano who likes to clean. >> yes. the most weird type of raging volcano. >> look, that film, taylor hackford, the director of that film, cast me
a very conventional life in ohio, big brood of kids. involved in church causes but she was part of one of, she was maybe the most interesting person to me in some ways because she really struggled to negotiate between her children, even as her views were being challenged. >> so talk about norman and walkers through the real crises the brothers faced as a question of service was engaged. >> norman became a pacifist in the 1960s, or right before the united states entered the war and he became involved in some organizations, antiwar organizations. that was sort of the very structure that would become the aclu after the war. [inaudible] he sort of started working, they went through political channels and also kind of grassroots organizations. and evan didn't believe in politics. and he just wanted -- he had kind of a martyr streak. he decided to come back to the united states and take a stand. ralph really heated wilson's call for a fight for freedom and are the kind of what whether this or whether to become an officer. ended up he wanted to become a fighter pilot. [inaudible] >> arthur was m
property. i don't think i would comment beyond that. >> big publisher of poems repress, thank you for a few minutes . . who remembers as a girl she lived next door to a lithuanian jewish family. she recalls she would call for young josephine to turn the light on for her. 60 years later you could hear the pride in her voice being called upon for that task. it's probable families living in our tenement open until the year 1935 discussed or of mitered norman thomas. tonight we are pleased to discuss his life and work with louisa thomas d. author of conscience. she will be signing copies of the book after the topic and keep in mind when you buy a book your supporting the author, the publisher and the museum. if you choose to become a member this evening, we will give you a complimentary copy of conscience. tonight's conversation is led by john mechem, executive editor and vice president of random house. a former editor of newsweek and pulitzer prize-winning author and commentator on politics,?g?g history and religious base in?gg america and is editor of our jeg public media and contributor tog
. it gives us the view point of hitler and his generals. and andrew is trying to answer the really big question that has haunted historians and many others for the last 70 years. why did germany lose the war? was it the superiority of th allied powers? or was it strategic errors on hitler's part? in fact, with all of hitler's advantages how could he have possibly ever lost this war? andrew roberts' great contribution is to let us participate, in effect, in a grand strategy course centered upon hitler and his generals. of all the books that have been published on world war ii, none before have viewed it from this perspective alone. it is an absolutely intriguing story, and i urge you all to get yourself a copy. surprisingly, there are copies for sale in the corner on the left here. but first, before you rush out to buy this copy, first, a few words from the great historian himself. and, yes, he does turn out to be a young one. andrew roberts. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it's a great honor to be invited to address you this owning, and -- this evening, and thank you very much inde
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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